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Primula vulgaris subsp. sibthorpii (Pr/Prim) AGM

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© RHS

Characteristics

Plant type

Herbaceous Perennial or Alpine/Rockery

Habit

Bushy

Fragrance

Flower

Resilience

Hardiness

H5 (hardy - cold winter)

Colour

Flower

Pink in Spring

Foliage

Green in Autumn, Spring, Summer and Winter

Size

Ultimate height

0.1-0.5 metres

Ultimate spread

0-0.1 metre

Time to ultimate height

2-5 years


Preferred common name

Sibthorp primrose

Family

Primulaceae


Primula are herbaceous or semi-evergreen perennials, forming a basal rosette of simple leaves, with salver-shaped or bell-shaped flowers which may be solitary or carried in an umbel or in whorls on an erect stem

Primroses are rosette-forming herbaceous perennials, sometimes grown as annuals, with clusters of solitary flowers arising from the rosette in late winter or early spring

P. vulgaris subsp. sibthorpii is a semi-evergreen perennial to to 15cm tall, with a rosette of obovate leaves and clusters of long-stalked purplish-pink flowers 2-3cm wide in early spring

How to grow

Sunlight

  • Full sun
  • Part shade

Aspect

  • South-facing, North-facing, West-facing or East-facing
  • Exposed or Sheltered

Cultivation

Best planted in dappled shade in humus-rich, moist neutral to acid soil. Tolerates full sun if soil remains moist at all times

Soil

  • Moist but well-drained or Poorly-drained
  • Acid, Alkaline or Neutral
  • Sand, Loam, Clay or Chalk

Propagation

Propagate by seed; take root cuttings when dormant in winter. Divide between autumn and early spring

Suggested planting locations and garden types

City/Courtyard Gardens, Coastal, Cottage/Informal Garden, Garden Edging, Flower borders and beds, Gravel Garden, Rock Garden or Patio/Container Plants


How to care

Pruning

No pruning required

Pests

Susceptible to leafhoppers, vine weevil, slugs and snails, caterpillars and aphids

Diseases

May be affected by primula brown core, grey mould, primula leaf spot and a virus